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Interventions for Neurological Diagnoses: Mat Interventions

presented by Kay Wing

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Geriatric patients with neurological deficits will present with a range of functional abilities. Clinicians will benefit from the addition of strategies to their intervention repertoire in order to provide the most efficacious treatment. All patients, regardless of the nuances of their specific neurological diagnosis and their function, need to progress through the basic movement patterns described in this course. Join Dr. Wing to learn how to apply the appropriate strategies for intervention to build on a patient’s current abilities and functional needs toward improving quality of life. A progression of interventions for patients with various neurological disorders will be demonstrated to facilitate motor control and postural transitions through interventions in a variety of postures and activities from the mat to functional mobility.

Meet Your Instructor

  • Kay Wing, PT, DPT, NCS

    Kay Wing, PT, DPT, NCS is the owner of Southwest Advanced Neurological Rehabilitation (SWAN Rehab), an outpatient rehabilitation facility specializing in the treatment of stroke, traumatic brain injury, and other neurological diseases. She received her physical therapy degree at Northwestern University and her doctorate of physical therapy from Northern Arizona University. She is a board certified specialist in neurological physical therapy. Dr. Wing has taught courses in neurological rehabilitation and mobility training as well as instructed PNF workshops throughout the United States and internationally for many years. Dr. Wing has collaborated with A.T. Still University, Northern Arizona University, and Arizona State University in clinical research to incorporate research into clinical practice and is an adjunct faculty member at Northern Arizona University and A.T. Still University. Dr. Wing is the recipient of the Section on Administration Outstanding Service Award, the Arizona Physical Therapy Association Outstanding Physical Therapist of the Year award, the Neurology Section Award for Clinical Excellence in Neurology, and the Henry O. and Florence P. Kendall Practice Award. She was also a finalist for the 2016 Phoenix Chamber of Commerce Athena award.

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

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  1. Rolling

    1. Rolling

    When in doubt… roll! Mat exercises facilitating the ability to roll are appropriate for patients with various neurological disorders and will be demonstrated to facilitate motor control and postural transitions. All patients, regardless of the nuances of their specific neurological diagnosis and their function, need to improve this basic movement pattern. When rolling improves, several components of function improve including walking, balance, core strength, and overall function.

  2. Side Lying and Side Sitting Activities

    2. Side Lying and Side Sitting Activities

    The ability to successfully side lie and side sit is essential in the progression to walking. In order to transition from rolling to standing, a patient must effectively transfer through a side lying and/or side sitting position, often in bed. The effect of trunk strength and mobility on side lying and side sitting functional movement will be discussed.

  3. Prone on Elbows, Quadruped, and Modified Plantigrade

    3. Prone on Elbows, Quadruped, and Modified Plantigrade

    The developmental postures of prone on elbows, quadruped, and modified plantigrade develop proximal and trunk strength through upper extremity weight bearing. Dr. Wing will • Facilitate multiple techniques for transitioning into prone on elbows, quadruped, and modified plantigrade. We'll also • Explain multiple postures that can be accomplished in modified plantigrade.

  4. Half Kneeling and Tall Kneeling

    4. Half Kneeling and Tall Kneeling

    In order to improve a patient’s ability for functional movement from bed mobility through walking, the ability to progress from half kneeling and tall kneeling activities is valuable. The strategies in this chapter contribute to the patient’s capacity to transition from the floor.