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Using Video Modeling as a Therapeutic Tool

presented by Tom Buggey

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What is the best way to teach people who have difficulty picturing their futures, have lost hope of succeeding, or have severe attention problems like some people with autism and ADHD? Whether it be in rehabilitation, teaching new skills, or modifying behaviors, video modeling has emerged as a research-based method that has been effective for all the issues listed above. The success of video-based instruction for persons with autism has proven to be especially exciting due to the small range of methods known to impact this population. In this course the participant will learn how to use 2 methods of video modeling that can help overcome problems of confidence and learned helplessness, and improve attention to the model or instructor. This course will deal with peer and point-of-view modeling as well as ideas for planning and filming. In another course in this series we will explore the area of Self-modeling where the child becomes both model and viewer. People who complete the course will learn research-based methods to reach people who need extra encouragement or present special challenges in learning.

Meet Your Instructor

  • Tom Buggey, PhD

    Dr. Buggey worked in the field of special education as a teacher and supervisor in the US and Canada prior to receiving his PhD in Early Intervention from Penn State University in 1993. He then spent 14 years as a professor at The University of Memphis. While in Memphis he was the primary investigator on numerous grants, most of which provided technical assistance to schools and families in the areas of inclusion, assistive technology, positive behavior supports, early intervention, and school reform. He also worked closely with the State Dept. of Education and the Division of Mental Retardation Services on numerous projects. In addition to the grants, he was also responsible for designing the curricula for the 5-course Home Manager Training Program now being offered in most Community Colleges in Tennessee – the first such program in the country. He also was instrumental in establishing the Access Center for Technology, the first ATA accredited assistive technology center located on a university campus. In 2007 he was appointed Siskin Chair of Excellence in Early Intervention at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga where he focused on his line of research in Video Self-Modeling (VSM). He has conducted research on this very promising technique (especially with children with autism) since 1993 and has published numerous research papers on the topic. In 2009 he published the first book on VSM Seeing is Believing. He is currently on the editorial board of Focus on Autism and serves on the advisory boards of Autism Behavior Services, Lookatmenow, and Invirtua. In December of 2014 he retired so that he could focus on the next steps in video modeling: providing a way to bring VSM and video-based instruction into mainstream use in the field of autism. He presently resides in Hixson, TN with his wife Ann.

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

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  1. Background and Basic Modeling

    1. Background and Basic Modeling

    Modeling has been part of the instructional repertoire of animals long before humans were around. As humans we use modeling at all levels of instruction from potty training to nuclear physics. This basic form of instruction becomes problematic for children with autism. They often have difficulty attending to in-vivo models such as teachers, therapists, and parents. The actual process of attending can be very uncomfortable for these kids. Luckily, problems in attending do not present when a model appears on screen.

  2. Becoming a Videographer: From Planning to Finished Product

    2. Becoming a Videographer: From Planning to Finished Product

    This chapter will cover the creation of video modeling movies for use with persons with autism and other developmental disabilities. Although VM can be used by anyone, including world-class athletes, it is finding a special therapeutic niche with use for persons with autism, language impairments, and social/emotional challenges. VM usually requires editing skills in order to show only positive behaviors. This is a critical aspect of all forms of video modeling.

  3. Peer/Adult Modeling

    3. Peer/Adult Modeling

    As early as preschool the primary models for children begin to transition from parents to peers. This chapter will focus on video peer-modeling. The chapter will begin with definitions and talk about advantages and weaknesses of PM. We will look at a case study, film and edit an example, and discuss the creation of the movie. Variations of PM will be presented.

  4. Point of View Modeling

    4. Point of View Modeling

    This chapter will cover the creation of point-of-view movies for use with persons with autism and other developmental disabilities. Although POVM can be used by anyone, it is finding a special therapeutic niche with use for persons with autism and cognitive disabilities. POVM will be explained using examples and photos.

  5. Is it Working? Evaluating Success

    5. Is it Working? Evaluating Success

    No intervention should be carried out with an individual without provisions for determining how well it is, or is not, working. This chapter will cover evaluation and data collection techniques related to video modeling. There will be a focus on collecting data through tallying and timing and, when appropriate, combining these to find a measure of fluency. Graphing results will also be discussed.