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Evidenced-Based School Practice

presented by Susan K. Effgen

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Satisfactory completion requirements: All disciplines must complete learning assessments to be awarded credit, no minimum score required unless otherwise specified within the course.

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Accreditation Check:
Must school-based physical therapists use evidenced-based practice? All therapists should be using evidenced-based interventions; however in school-based practice there is a federal law mandating interventions based on peer-reviewed research when practicable. This course will present interventions that have been studied using systematic reviews and meta-analysis when available.

Meet Your Instructor

Susan K. Effgen, PT, PhD, FAPTA

Susan K. Effgen, PT, PhD, FAPTA, is a professor in the Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Kentucky. She is an established educator and researcher in pediatric physical therapy and has taught at several universities including the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. In 1986, she established the sixth doctoral program…

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

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1. Evidenced-Based Practice

Chapter one will cover the concepts of evidenced-based practice (EBP) and peer reviewed research. Interventions addressing alterations in body functions and structures, limitations in activities, and restrictions in participation will be reviewed.

2. Evidenced-Based Interventions of Specific Diagnoses

In chapter two, you will review evidenced-based practice (EBP) and peer reviewed research that supports common therapeutic interventions used by school-based physical therapists for children having cerebral palsy, developmental coordination disorder, and autism.

3. IEP and Plan of Care

The last chapter of the course is a case example of an atypical student who might benefit from school-based physical therapy. The individualized education program (IEP) and physical therapy Plan of Care are also discussed.

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