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Barbara Lutz, PhD, RN, CRRN, APHN-BC, FAHA, FNAP, FAAN

Barbara Lutz Instructor Bio:
Dr. Barbara Lutz is the McNeill Distinguished Professor at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington School of Nursing. Her 30+ year career as a rehabilitation and public health nurse spans practice, research, education, and service. Her research focuses on understanding the needs and experiences of patients with stroke and other chronic illnesses and their family caregivers as they move through the continuum of care, from acute care to home. The goal of her work is to engage patients and their family caregivers in developing person and family-centered, community-based interventions for people with stroke and other chronic illnesses. She is a Co-Investigator on a PCORI-funded research study to test a person-centered, community-based Emergency Department (ED) to Home transitional care intervention developed in partnership with a research team that includes former patients, family caregivers, social workers, ED physicians, staff of two local Area Agencies on Aging, and health services researchers.

Dr. Lutz is a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing, American Heart Association (AHA), and National Academies of Practice. She is a board member of the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses and is a co-author on a position paper on the transitional care needs for patients needing rehabilitation services and on AHA scientific statements on palliative care in stroke, risk adjustment for stroke, and best evidence on stroke caregiver interventions. She has also served as a member of the ANA Care Coordination Quality Measures Steering Committee and as a rehabilitation expert on the Joint Commission Technical Advisory Panel for Comprehensive Stroke Center Certification.

Barbara Lutz's Continuing Education Courses

Stroke Recovery Models: Addressing Stroke Survivor and Caregiver Needs

Stroke Recovery Models: Addressing Stroke Survivor and Caregiver Needs

Each year an estimated 970,000 people in the U.S., and 15 million people globally, have a stroke. Stroke is a major cause of life-long disability. In order to address the needs of stroke survivors and their family caregivers it is critical… Read Morearrow_right

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Preparing Family Members for Stroke Caregiving

Preparing Family Members for Stroke Caregiving

There are approximately 4 million stroke family caregivers in the United States. Research indicates that these caregivers are often underprepared to assume the caregiving role post-discharge. In this course, Dr. Barbara Lutz discusses the… Read Morearrow_right

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Transitions of Care in Stroke

Transitions of Care in Stroke

There has been increased focus on improving care coordination and transitions across the care continuum, due, in part, to the recent health care legislation focused on improving patient outcomes and reducing costs in post-acute care. In… Read Morearrow_right

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Nursing’s Role in Care Transitions from Acute Care to Post-Acute Care

Nursing’s Role in Care Transitions from Acute Care to Post-Acute Care

This course gives students an overview of the nurse’s role in facilitating care transitions for stroke survivors from acute care to post-acute care to optimize outcomes for the patient and family. Specific risk factors associated with… Read Morearrow_right

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Post-Stroke Resources and Community Reintegration

Post-Stroke Resources and Community Reintegration

Transitioning home and adapting to life after stroke is often difficult for stroke survivors and their family caregivers. Successful recovery and community reintegration is dependent on stroke survivors and their family members being able… Read Morearrow_right

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Palliative Care and Advance Directives After Stroke

Palliative Care and Advance Directives After Stroke

This course provides students with an overview of the palliative care needs of post-stroke patients and their family members, and provides recommendations for nurses caring for stroke patients and their families across the care continuum.… Read Morearrow_right

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Stroke in Young & Middle-Aged Adults: Ages 18 to 64

Stroke in Young & Middle-Aged Adults: Ages 18 to 64

Approximately one-third of those hospitalized with stroke are under the age of 65. African Americans are approximately twice as likely to experience a stroke at a younger age when compared to Whites. The needs of younger stroke survivors… Read Morearrow_right

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