Social Communication: Intervention for Children

presented by Bonnie Brinton & Martin Fujiki

Accreditation Check:

What procedures and activities can be used to facilitate social communication in intervention sessions and classrooms? How can progress on social communication goals be monitored? This course will present a number of procedures and activities that can be implemented to highlight various aspects of social communication simultaneously. Activities are designed to reflect authentic social interactional situations for children of different ages and to be practical to implement in clinical and educational settings.

Meet Your Instructors

  • Bonnie Brinton, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    Bonnie Brinton, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    Bonnie Brinton, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Brigham Young University (BYU), Provo, UT. Dr. Brinton has worked as a practicing speech language pathologist in school, clinic, and hospital settings. She has also worked as a research scientist at the University of Kansas, and an associate professor of speech language pathology at the University of Nevada, Reno. At BYU, Dr. Brinton has served as an associate dean in the McKay School of Education, and as Dean of Graduate Studies. Dr. Brinton has chaired the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Committee on Language Learning Disorders, and has served on the program committee for the ASHA convention on multiple occasions. She also served as an associate editor for the journal, Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools from 1990 to 2000. Dr. Brinton, jointly with Martin Fujiki, has received the Karl G. Maeser Research and Creative Arts Award from BYU and the Frank R. Kleffner Clinical Career Award from the Utah Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Dr. Brinton is also an ASHA fellow. Dr. Brinton has published over 70 journal articles and book chapters and two books. She is a sought-after lecturer, having been an invited speaker in numerous settings nationally and internationally, including Canada, England, China, and Poland. Her work has focused on the social communication skills of individuals with disabilities, with a particular focus on children with language impairment (LI). Her earlier research examined the pragmatic abilities of children with LI. These studies let to investigations focusing on the social outcomes experienced by these children. Dr. Brinton’s research documented that children with LI had fewer friends, were less accepted by peers, and participated in fewer social interactions than children with typical language skills. Her most recent work has focused on developing interventions to address deficits in social communication in children with a range of language disabilities.

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  • Martin Fujiki, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    Martin Fujiki, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

    Martin Fujiki, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is professor and chair of the Department of Communication Disorders at Brigham Young University (BYU), Provo, Utah. He has practiced in the school setting as well as working as a research scientist at the University of Kansas and an associate professor at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Fujiki has served as an associate editor for the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, The American Journal of Speech Language Pathology, and Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in the Schools. He has also served on the ad hoc committee for language in context of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and on the national advisory board of Pearson Assessment. Dr. Fujiki, jointly with Bonnie Brinton, has received the Karl G. Maeser Research and Creative Arts Award from BYU and the Frank R. Kleffner Clinical Career Award from the Utah Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Dr. Fujiki is an ASHA fellow, and in 2015 received Honors of the Association from ASHA. Dr. Fujiki’s work has focused on the interactional skills of children with language impairment. He has authored over 70 publications, most focusing on the social and emotional competence of children with language impairment (LI). Working with Dr. Bonnie Brinton, he has examined the social outcomes experienced by children with LI, documenting that these children have fewer friends, poor peer acceptance, poor self-esteem, and fewer social interactions than typical children. His most recent work has focused on the social cognitive skills of these children, with a particular emphasis on emotional intelligence.

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

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  1. Employing Conversational Games

    1. Employing Conversational Games

    Children with disabilities often have difficulty understanding the emotions of others and cooperating with others in conversation. Interactive conversational games can be designed to help children interpret emotion cues and respond appropriately to conversational partners.

  2. Using Scripts to Enhance Social Communication

    2. Using Scripts to Enhance Social Communication

    Children with disabilities often struggle in a variety of social and academic contexts because they lack structural language skills, pragmatic ability, or social and emotional knowledge. Enacting scripts in treatment can enhance language processing, pragmatics, and social and emotional learning within the same activity.

  3. Story Sharing to Enhance Social Communication

    3. Story Sharing to Enhance Social Communication

    Social communication difficulties limit a child’s understanding of the social world. In addition, these difficulties often limit their comprehension of stories and literature. Story or literature-based activities can be employed to enhance social communication as well as story comprehension.

  4. Journaling

    4. Journaling

    Promoting generalization of behaviors facilitated in treatment is a constant challenge. A journaling activity conducted at the conclusion of each session can review concepts presented and encourage generalization of new behaviors.