Skills for Helping Clients Succeed in Therapy

presented by Scott Yaruss

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Understanding the process of change provides clinicians with a strong foundation for guiding their clients through therapy. Knowing this big picture is not sufficient, however, because clinicians must also become experienced in using specific counseling strategies that help clients make their way through that process of change. This course (part two of a three part series) will help clinicians develop these counseling strategies by describing several key skills that can be used both in and out of treatment to help clients better understand their situation and work in concrete ways toward a preferred future, whether that involves improved fluency, better communication attitudes, or both. This is the second in a three course series.

Meet Your Instructor

  • Scott Yaruss, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F

    Scott Yaruss, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F

    J. Scott Yaruss, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, F-ASHA, is an Associate Professor and Director of the Master’s Degree program in Speech-Language Pathology in the Department of Communication Science and Disorders at the University of Pittsburgh, Coordinator of Clinical Research in the Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, and Director of the Stuttering Center of Western Pennsylvania. A board-certified specialist in fluency disorders, Dr. Yaruss has served on the board of directors for the National Stuttering Association and as Associate Coordinator for the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s Special Interest Division for Fluency Disorders. His research examines factors that may contribute to the development of stuttering in young children as well as methods for assessing and evaluating treatment outcomes in children and adults who stutter. Dr. Yaruss has published more than 60 papers in peer-reviewed journals and nearly 100 other articles, papers, and chapters on stuttering. He is author, co-author, or editor of several booklets, books, and brochures on stuttering, including the Overall Assessment of the Speaker’s Experience of Stuttering (OASES), a comprehensive evaluation tool for children, adolescents, and adults who stutter; School-age Stuttering Therapy: A Practical Guide, and the Minimizing Bullying for Children Who Stutter program (all published by Stuttering Therapy Resources, Inc. [www.StutteringTherapyResources.com], a publishing company dedicated to developing useful resources for helping speech-language pathologists work with people who stutter.) Dr. Yaruss has been named Speech-Language Pathologist of the Year by the National Stuttering Association and received the University of Pittsburgh School of Health and Rehabilitation Science Dean’s Distinguished Teaching Award. Dr. Yaruss teaches classes on stuttering and counseling methods for speech-language pathologists at the University of Pittsburgh and frequently conducts workshops designed to help speech-language pathologists improve their ability to work with individuals who stutter. Information about Dr. Yaruss’s workshops can be found at www.Yaruss.com.

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

Download Learning Objectives
  1. How Do We Interact with Clients in Therapy?

    1. How Do We Interact with Clients in Therapy?

    Chapter One introduces three ways of interacting with clients as described by Luterman in his classic text (informing, persuading, valuing and listening). The key point is that different methods achieve different goals.

  2. How Do We Counsel?

    2. How Do We Counsel?

    Chapter Two reviews the concept of counseling microskills and focuses on the process of listening to clients in order to extract a “core message” to ensure that the clinician can understand the perspective of the speaker.

  3. How Do We Respond to What We've Heard?

    3. How Do We Respond to What We've Heard?

    Chapter Three highlights the fact that listening well does little good for the client if the client does not know that we have listened. In order to convey our understanding of the client’s perspective, we have to respond with empathy to reflect what we heard.

  4. What Types of Other Responses Can We Use?

    4. What Types of Other Responses Can We Use?

    Chapter Four explores other possible responses to clients’ statements (e.g., probes, brainstorms, summaries) and discusses when it might be appropriate to use one response versus another.