Hospital Lines, Tubes and Drains

presented by Greg Adams

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“Hospital Lines” is geared to the beginner and veteran alike. It provides an in-depth review of the lines, tubes and drains connected to patients in hospitals and aides in the understanding of the underlying purpose of the device and therapy implications. Every attempt is made to simplify the complexities and point out common mistakes so they can be avoided. Some lines, tubes and drains are connected to monitors or other machinery. “Hospital Lines” is designed to educate the therapist on how to work with this equipment, improving a therapist’s ability to monitor a patient’s status, so an appropriate rehab technique can be performed.

Meet Your Instructor

  • Greg Adams, PT, MS, CCS, CEP

    Greg has been very involved in cardiopulmonary physical therapy since 1992. He has been certified in Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) since 1993 and obtained his certification as an Exercise Specialist in cardiopulmonary rehab from the American College in Sports Medicine in 1995. In addition to his work in multiple teaching hospitals, including Temple University Hospital, Albert Einstein Hospital (Philadelphia), and the University of Maryland Medical Center. Greg has taught at conferences and for physical and occupational therapy programs. Greg has taught over 100 "Bells & Whistles"(SM) and Telemetry Courses internationally since 2001. Greg's professional background includes working in Neonatal and Adult ICUs. Greg has worked with patients who have undergone transplants, lung volume reductions, valve replacements, and bypasses. His specialized experience includes 2 years on a ventilator rehab unit and several years as a traveling Physical Therapist during which he had the opportunity to learn a variety of techniques used in ICUs nationwide. Greg is a board certified Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Clinical Specialist through the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties.

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

Download Learning Objectives
  1. Access Lines Part I

    1. Access Lines Part I

    Distinguish the type of venous access line in place and its particular therapy implications. Specify where an IO access line is inserted. Determine if vesicants are safer to insert in the peripheral or central line access. Indicate if raising your arm moves the central line towards or away from the heart. List safe limits of monitored systemic functions as well as three lines and how they may affect rehabilitation.

  2. Access Lines Part II

    2. Access Lines Part II

    Delineate epidural, dialysis and cardiopulmonary lines and their therapy implications. State four treatment precautions/contraindications that could adversely affect a patient’s status and why. Name what Lines can usually be disconnected before moving a patient, what Lines must be clamped before moving a patient, and what Lines need to be leveled after working with a patient.

  3. Multiple Uses for a Tube

    3. Multiple Uses for a Tube

    List three tubes and how they may affect rehabilitation. Name what Tubes can usually be disconnected before moving a patient, what Tubes must be clamped before moving a patient, and what Tubes need to be leveled after working with a patient. Distinguish between the various Gastrointestinal (GI) Tubes and Tracheal Tubes and their therapy implications.

  4. Drains Part I

    4. Drains Part I

    List three drains and how they may affect rehabilitation. Distinguish between the various drains placed in the head, back, abdomen and extremities and their therapy implications.

  5. Drains Part II

    5. Drains Part II

    Name what Drains can usually be disconnected before moving a patient, what Drains must be clamped before moving a patient, and what Drains need to be leveled after working with a patient. Distinguish the type of chest drain in place, its function, and its particular therapy implications