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Principles of Taking a History and Screening Systems in Young Children

presented by Venita Lovelace-Chandler

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Satisfactory completion requirements: All disciplines must complete learning assessments to be awarded credit, no minimum score required unless otherwise specified within the course.

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Why do therapists practicing in pediatrics need to take a patient history? Why do they need to screen systems and recognize the signs and symptoms that indicate the need for a medical or health care practitioner referral? This introductory course is designed to enhance the skills of therapists working with children in conducting selected portions of an examination which include taking a history, quickly screening systems, addressing health promotion, and recognizing the signs and symptoms that indicate the need for a referral to another health practitioner. Screening might be needed at any time when a patient suddenly presents with a new sign or symptom.

Meet Your Instructor

Venita Lovelace-Chandler, PT, PHD, PCS

Dr. Lovelace-Chandler has been an educator in pediatric topics for over 30 years to professional and post-professional physical therapy students. She has over 40 years of experience in pediatrics, has recertified as a specialist two times, and still carries a small caseload. She taught numerous Advanced Clinical Practice courses in pediatrics for the APTA, has…

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

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1. The Importance of History Taking and Screening Pediatric Patients

Therapists practicing in pediatrics are expected to be able to determine if a patient should receive therapy or be referred to another practitioner in addition to or instead of receiving services from the therapist. That determination requires an understanding of scope of practice and professional standards.

2. Best Practice in Pediatric History Taking

Children present with clinical manifestations unique to the pediatric population, and techniques for assessment and examination differ as well. This chapter provides therapists with best practice concepts in taking a history, including family-centered care.

3. Screening Systems for Signs, Symptoms, and Red Flags

Screening of systems follows the taking of a history, and the goal of screening is to recognize the need for referral to a physician or other practitioner as quickly as possible for best patient outcomes. Therapists need to identify signs, symptoms and flags while rapidly screening the following systems: neurological, musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, integumentary, and urogenital. Examples of red flags are offered and explained.

4. Health Promotion and Anticipatory Guidance

While taking the history, the therapist also identifies health restoration and prevention needs and coexisting health problems that may have implications for intervention. Therapists are able to provide consultation time to discuss current, pertinent health issues, to anticipate any preventative information the family should know in the near future, and to suggest physical activities to promote health.

More Courses in this Series

Taking a History for a Pediatric Patient

Presented by Venita Lovelace-Chandler, PT, PHD, PCS

Taking a History for a Pediatric Patient

Subscribe now, and access clinical education and patient education—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.
How can a therapist systematically gather information and data, from both the past and the present, related to why the family is seeking services? This course suggests the sources used to gather information for the history, provides some typical information to gather at different ages, and demonstrates taking a history from the family of a young child.

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Screening and Physical Examination for Signs and Symptoms in Pediatric Patients

Presented by Venita Lovelace-Chandler, PT, PHD, PCS

Screening and Physical Examination for Signs and Symptoms in Pediatric Patients

Subscribe now, and access clinical education and patient education—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.
What systems should be reviewed when conducting a pediatric review of systems and screening for signs and symptoms? How does the history help to prioritize the physical examination, including inspection and palpation? This course describes evidence for conducting a review of systems in children and screening for signs and symptoms. The pediatric therapist should be able to organize findings to support the best intervention strategies, identify findings that should be shared with other professionals to ensure optimal care and outcomes, AND recognize findings that are outside the scope of the therapist’s knowledge, experience, or expertise and require a referral to an appropriate practitioner.

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Promoting Upright Mobility in Young Children

Presented by Venita Lovelace-Chandler, PT, PHD, PCS

Promoting Upright Mobility in Young Children

Subscribe now, and access clinical education and patient education—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.
How early should a child be placed in standing or encouraged to take steps? When should a child who is non-ambulatory be given a motorized car? All therapists working in pediatrics need to meet the developmental, postural, and movement needs of young children. This course provides the evidence-based interventions to foster upright postures, standing, and walking, when possible, and the use of other forms of independent mobility, including motorized devices, when the child is not starting to walk. All interventions utilize concepts of child motivation and interaction with the environment for cognitive growth, communication, and participation with family members and peers.

View full course details

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