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Orthopedic Connections to Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

presented by Heather Rader, PT, DPT, PRPC, BCB-PMD

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Disclosure Statement:

Financial— Heather Rader is Faculty, Herman and Wallace Pelvic Rehabilitation Institute. She receives compensation from MedBridge for the production of this course. There are no other relevant financial relationships. Nonfinancial— No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists.

Satisfactory completion requirements: All disciplines must complete learning assessments to be awarded credit, no minimum score required unless otherwise specified within the course.

MedBridge is committed to accessibility for all of our subscribers. If you are in need of a disability-related accommodation, please contact [email protected]. We will process requests for reasonable accommodation and will provide reasonable accommodations where appropriate, in a prompt and efficient manner.

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Video Runtime: 68 Minutes; Learning Assessment Time: 47 Minutes

This course will focus on connections between common orthopedic dysfunction seen in clinical practice to pelvic floor dysfunctions. Orthopedic conditions such as back pain, hip pain, orthopedic trauma and surgery, and diastasis recti abdominis cluster with pelvic floor dysfunctions, such as incontinence and pelvic pain syndromes in clinical practice. Understanding the reasons why these comorbidities cluster together will assist the clinician in recognizing the orthopedic connections between dysfunctions of the pelvic floor with dysfunctions of the spine, hip, and abdominal wall.

Meet Your Instructor

Heather Rader, PT, DPT, PRPC, BCB-PMD

Dr. Heather Rader is the owner of Rader Pelvic Physical Therapy, a practice devoted to the treatment of pregnancy-related pain and dysfunction, incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and complex pelvic pain in all genders. A physical therapist since 1994, she graduated from the University of Miami with a master's degree in physical therapy, and she completed…

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

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1. Relationships Between the Low Back, Hip, Abdominal Wall, and the Pelvic Floor

This chapter will define the anatomic structural relationships between the low back, hip, and abdominal wall with the pelvic floor region. A summary of the functional interactions between the trunk, lower extremities, and the pelvic floor will be described.

2. The Pelvic Floor and the Core

This chapter will examine the musculoskeletal relationships between the pelvic floor region and core stabilization of the trunk. An overview of the four inner core muscles (the breathing diaphragm, transverse abdominis, multifidus, and pelvic floor) will be presented. Clinical implications of the connection between core function and pelvic floor dysfunction in clinical practice will be presented.

3. The Pelvic Floor and the Low Back

This chapter will describe the musculoskeletal relationships between low back pain and incontinence. An overview of the anatomical connections between the structures of the low back and the pelvic floor will be presented. A summary of the dysfunctional relationship between low back pain and incontinence will be described.

4. The Hip and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

This chapter will characterize the musculoskeletal relationships between hip joint dysfunction and pelvic floor dysfunction. An overview the prevalence of hip joint dysfunction and pelvic floor dysfunction will be presented. Clinical implications of the connection between hip pain and pelvic floor dysfunction will be investigated.

5. The Abdominal Wall and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

This chapter will depict the musculoskeletal relationships between diastasis recti abdominis (DRA) and urogenital dysfunctions. An overview of the anatomical connections between the structures of the abdominal wall and the pelvic floor will be presented. Clinical implications of the connection between DRA and pelvic floor dysfunction will be investigated.

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