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Considerations of Cognition: Mobility and Relation of Exercise to Cognitive Function

presented by Deb Kegelmeyer

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Satisfactory completion requirements: All disciplines must complete learning assessments to be awarded credit, no minimum score required unless otherwise specified within the course.

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Mobility is a complex and high-level activity involving both motor and cognitive skills. This course describes the interrelationship of cognition, mobility and exercise. Cognition plays a role in overground walking and in complex walking environments. This course reviews the current evidence regarding the role of different cognitive domains and mobility. The course then examines the assessment and treatment of mobility issues, incorporating cognitive interventions such as dual-task training. Finally the course examines the current evidence for the use of exercise to improve cognition and describes evidence-based interventions to improve cognition in healthy older adults and those with pathologic conditions such as dementia.

Meet Your Instructor

Deb Kegelmeyer, PT, DPT, MS, GCS

Dr. Kegelmeyer has over 30 years of clinical experience and is currently a Professor of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at The Ohio State University. She has extensive clinical expertise, having worked in acute care and outpatient therapy, and spent 10 years as director of physical therapy at a skilled nursing facility. Currently she works as…

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

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1. Impact of Cognition on Mobility and its Assessment

Cognition plays a role in overground walking and in complex walking environments. This chapter reviews the current evidence regarding the role of different cognitive domains and mobility.

2. Treating Clients with Dementia for Mobility Problems

Cognitive function has been shown to correlate with gait parameters and fall risk. It is increasingly being recognized that interventions to improve mobility and prevent falls in older adults and those with dementia must incorporate some form of cognitive training. This chapter examines cognitive-based interventions to improve mobility and safety.

3. Does Exercise Improve Cognition?

New evidence shows that exercise can have a positive impact on cognition. This chapter examines the current evidence for the use of exercise to improve cognition and describes evidence-based interventions to improve cognition in healthy older adults and those with pathologic conditions such as dementia. The most recent evidence regarding type(s) of exercise shown to improve cognitive function is summarized.

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