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Balance Training and Fall Prevention for the Active Geriatric Population

presented by John O'Halloran, PT, DPT, OCS, ATC (retired), CSCS (retired), Cert MDT, Certified SCTM-1

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Disclosure Statement:

Financial: John O’Halloran receives compensation from MedBridge for this course. There is no financial interest beyond the production of this course.

Non-Financial: John O’Halloran has no competing non-financial interests or relationships with regard to the content presented in this course.

Satisfactory completion requirements: All disciplines must complete learning assessments to be awarded credit, no minimum score required unless otherwise specified within the course.

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As the population ages, there is a decline in balance and postural control and thus the increase in falls. To address this, the traditional approach is to practice balance exercises on various surfaces and with rehab tasks that involve perturbation activities to stimulate and facilitate the human body’s systems of balance: vestibular, vision, and mechanoreceptors. This course will enhance the attendee’s knowledge base by providing evidence-based research on balance to augment what is currently mostly done anecdotally. This course is also designed to excite the attendee in first knowing “what’s inside the box” before they can look “outside the box;” to help them get out of the common rut of clinical practice of habit and routine, and jazz up their geriatric population's balance training programs for fall prevention.

Meet Your Instructor

John O'Halloran, PT, DPT, OCS, ATC (retired), CSCS (retired), Cert MDT, Certified SCTM-1

John O'Halloran, PT, DPT, OCS, ATC (retired), CSCS (retired), Cert MDT, Certified SCTM-1, is an American Physical Therapy Association board-certified orthopedic clinical specialist with more than 30 years of experience in the field of orthopedics. He earned his postprofessional Doctor of Physical Therapy from Temple University and has studied orthopedic and sports therapy abroad in…

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

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1. Balance Training and Fall Prevention for the Active Geriatric Population

This chapter will review the literature on the implications of balance training. The chapter will discuss the various components of balance and how they relate to fall risk and prevention.

2. Review of Literature: Balance and Common Orthopedic Conditions

This chapter will discuss the wide ranges of interventions of balance training and fall prevention. Interventions ranging from Tai Chi to Pilates will be discussed and critiqued.

3. Lab and Clinical Demonstrations

This chapter will take the review of literature into practical clinical application. Detailed lab demonstrations and case studies will be discussed and performed.

More Courses in this Series

The New Geriactive Patient

Presented by John O'Halloran, PT, DPT, OCS, ATC (retired), CSCS (retired), Cert MDT, Certified SCTM-1

The New Geriactive Patient

Subscribe now, and access clinical education and patient education—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.
The human body eventually develops age-related changes that affect posture, strength and balance. These physiological changes can reduce a person’s activity level and increase the likelihood for a fall. A person’s ability to maintain upright posture, strength and balance declines after the fourth decade of life. Thus, to remain active and achieve a longer lifespan of safe, independent living it is imperative that an adult participate in a regular physical fitness program that encompasses all the key components of fitness. Among these are core and hip stability training incorporated with a lifelong progressive balance program. Today’s traditional rehabilitation programs designed to address fall risk and prevention are typically performed by clinicians who do not incorporate the evidence that has been identified through research that can help to achieve superior results to what is currently being offered to our geriatric population. Today’s geriatric population is more informed and has higher expectations of their rehabilitation providers. The traditional geriatric patient is being replaced by a more active senior, and thus the new term GERIACTIVE! This course will provide the attendee the knowledge of the highest and most current evidence-based research for core and hip stability, as well as balance training, to take your current programs to the next level and challenge the future aging population.

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Core Stability and Fall Prevention

Presented by John O'Halloran, PT, DPT, OCS, ATC (retired), CSCS (retired), Cert MDT, Certified SCTM-1

Core Stability and Fall Prevention

Subscribe now, and access clinical education and patient education—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.
Core strengthening exercises are often used as a rehabilitation exercise for athletes. However, today there is currently valid evidence to support incorporating these exercises into all rehab settings to enhance outcomes. Core strengthening exercises help the development of proximal stability for distal mobility and for satisfying the human body’s stages of motor control. Traditional fall prevention programs often do not include performing core exercises that facilitate all the facets of core stability, and that is a main focus of this course.

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Hip Stability and Fall Prevention

Presented by John O'Halloran, PT, DPT, OCS, ATC (retired), CSCS (retired), Cert MDT, Certified SCTM-1

Hip Stability and Fall Prevention

Subscribe now, and access clinical education and patient education—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.
Fall risk increases significantly as the elderly age. As the human body ages, there is a significant decline in strength, especially in the lower extremities. In addition to the decline in strength, there is a gradual progression of postural changes and loss of flexibility. One area that drastically becomes compromised is the lumbopelvic hip region. The principles of motor control state that to have optimal locomotion, the human body must first achieve a balance between proximal stability and distal mobility. The principle of reciprocal inhibition stresses that when muscle groups become adaptively shortened, opposing muscle groups are also inhibited. In no other region of the human body does this principle have more practical application than the hip. The clinician that designs a fall prevention program that addresses the fundamentals of motor control and identifies patients who are either deficient in mobility or stability of the hips will achieve greater outcomes in reducing falls than their colleagues.

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