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Pediatric Hand Therapy: Assessment and Treatment of Congenital Anomalies

presented by Mary "Peggy" Faussett, MOTR/L, CHT and Jill Peck-Murray, MOTR/L, CHT

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Satisfactory completion requirements: All disciplines must complete learning assessments to be awarded credit, no minimum score required unless otherwise specified within the course.

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Due to genetic conditions or abnormal embryological development, infants may be born with congenital anomalies, and many will require therapy. The therapist may have limited experience with these unique diagnoses. This course will review aspects that might cause abnormal development and discuss the newest classification system used to describe the upper extremity congenital anomalies. Instructors will discuss five common congenital anomalies found in pediatric hand therapy and describe their symptoms and subtypes. Therapy intervention, common surgical intervention, and postoperative therapy will be reviewed for these congenital anomalies.

Meet Your Instructors

Mary "Peggy" Faussett, MOTR/L, CHT

Mary "Peggy" Faussett is an occupational therapist and certified hand therapist. She graduated with a master's in Occupational Therapy in 2001 from Chatham University. She became a Certified Hand Therapist in 2012. Peggy currently works at Children's Hospital Colorado as the Program Coordinator for the Pediatric Hand Therapy Program. She enjoys treating children of all…

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Jill Peck-Murray, MOTR/L, CHT

Jill Peck-Murray, MOTR/L, CHT, is a pediatric hand therapist. She worked as an occupational therapist/hand therapist at Rady Children's Hospital in San Diego, CA from 1982 through 2017. During her 35 years, she gained expertise, with special skills in creative splinting/orthotic intervention, and developed the hand therapy program for the hospital. She is currently devoting…

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

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1. Classification Systems for Upper Extremity Congenital Anomalies

This chapter will briefly review normal development of the hand and upper extremity and highlight primary reasons for abnormal development. The incidence and types of upper extremity congenital anomalies and their classification systems are explained.

2. Radial Longitudinal Deficiency

Radial longitudinal deficiency is due to a lack of development of the radial side of the extremity and presents with instability and weakness of the thumb (hypoplastic thumb) or entire forearm. It is noted in infancy but impacts the child throughout his life. This chapter will explain the OMT classification of the diagnosis and describe the condition, subtypes, and how the condition may impact the child. It will also discuss some surgical options and therapeutic intervention (pre and postoperative).

3. Trigger Thumb and Trigger Finger

Trigger thumb or finger are a restriction of full, smooth motion of the thumb or finger tendon. It can be present at birth or noted later in infancy. This chapter will explain the OMT classification of the diagnosis and describe the condition, subtypes, and how the condition may impact the child. It will also discuss some surgical options and therapeutic intervention (pre and postoperative).

4. Camptodactyly

Camptodactyly is a flexed posturing of finger/s often present in infancy or later in adolescence. This chapter will explain the OMT classification of the diagnosis and describe the condition, subtypes, and how condition may impact the child. It will also discuss some surgical options and therapeutic intervention (pre and postoperative).

5. Syndactyly

Syndactyly is skin and/or bony fusion of the fingers due to lack of finger separation in utero. This chapter will explain the OMT classification of the diagnosis and describe the condition, subtypes, and how the condition may impact the child. It will also emphasis some surgical options and therapeutic intervention (postoperative).

6. Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita (AMC)

Arthrogryposis is a condition with multiple joint contractures and weakness. It presents in infancy but impacts the child throughout his life. This chapter will explain the OMT classification of the diagnosis and describe of the condition, subtypes, and how the condition may impact the child. It will also discuss some surgical options and therapeutic intervention (pre and postoperative).

More Courses in this Series

Introduction to Pediatric Hand Therapy Part 1

Presented by Mary "Peggy" Faussett, MOTR/L, CHT and Jill Peck-Murray, MOTR/L, CHT

Introduction to Pediatric Hand Therapy Part 1

Subscribe now, and access clinical education and patient education—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.

A therapist who treats pediatric patients may not be aware of the orthopedic aspects of care for a pediatric patient with hand or upper extremity injuries or conditions. An adult hand therapist may be aware of the pediatric conditions and developmental issues that can affect care of the pediatric hand patient. This course will introduce the things that are unique about the pediatric hand patient, the role of the pediatric hand therapist, and the common pediatric conditions seen by a pediatric hand therapist. Part 1 will also offer some strategies for successful evaluation and goal setting with pediatric hand patients.

View full course details

Introduction to Pediatric Hand Therapy Part 2

Presented by Mary "Peggy" Faussett, MOTR/L, CHT and Jill Peck-Murray, MOTR/L, CHT

Introduction to Pediatric Hand Therapy Part 2

Subscribe now, and access clinical education and patient education—anytime, anywhere—with video instruction from recognized industry experts.

Pediatric patients pose challenges to therapists due to multiple issues: time limitations, limited tolerance for painful intervention or cold/thermal modalities, poor compliance with typical exercises and home programs, and challenges for provision of appropriate orthoses/splints. This course will provide an overview of common pediatric upper extremity conditions, with a focus on successful strategies for how to treat, provide orthoses/splints, and design home programs for pediatric patients with these conditions.

View full course details

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