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Ballet Technique: Vocabulary, Mechanics, Stressors, & Modifications

presented by Shaw Bronner, PT, PhD, OCS

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Disclosure Statement:

Financial - Shaw Bronner receives compensation from MedBridge for the production of this course. She is a consultant to the Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation. Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists.

Satisfactory completion requirements: All disciplines must complete learning assessments to be awarded credit, no minimum score required unless otherwise specified within the course.

MedBridge is committed to accessibility for all of our subscribers. If you are in need of a disability-related accommodation, please contact [email protected]. We will process requests for reasonable accommodation and will provide reasonable accommodations where appropriate, in a prompt and efficient manner.

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All dance forms require mastery of alignment and stabilization during drastically different types of postures and movements (e.g. releve, battement, floor and kneeling work, back hinges, etc.). In order to develop effective injury prevention and treatment strategies, it is important that health care practitioners understand the vocabulary and biomechanics of exercises and combinations specific to each technique. The goals of this lecture are to expand the practitioner's understanding about ballet, improve the level of communication between clinicians and dancers, enable the practitioner to structure a more functional progression following injury or surgery, and develop biomechanically sound technique corrections or modifications following injury.

Meet Your Instructor

Shaw Bronner, PT, PhD, OCS

Shaw Bronner's first career was as a dancer, performing nationally and internationally with several modern dance companies. Dr. Bronner earned her PhD at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (now Rutgers University) in rehabilitation and movement sciences, earned an EdM in biobehavioral studies at Columbia University's Teachers College, and did her physical…

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Chapters & Learning Objectives

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Download the learning objectives for Ballet Technique: Vocabulary, Mechanics, Stressors, & Modifications.

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1. Introduction to Ballet and Ballet Vocabulary

Ballet technique is a critical skill taught in most serious dance training studios, including those that are thought to be primarily modern dance, such as The Ailey School and The Graham School. While there are several classical ballet training systems, such as Vaganova (Russian), Cecchetti (Italian), Bournonville (Danish), and Royal Academy of Dance (English), they all share the basic movements and vocabulary.

2. What is Good Alignment? Discussion of Optimal and Non-Optimal Mechanics in Ballet and Resulting Injuries

Comparisons of an advanced and beginner dancer will be made to discuss technique and alignment errors. Complaints and injuries due to alignment problems will be discussed.

3. Injury Prevention and Treatment Strategies

This chapter will address injury prevention and treatment strategies, including technique correction, strengthening, flexibility, and mobilization exercises.

4. Progression for Return to Ballet Technique Class

As rehabilitation advances, we address alignment and how to access the correct muscles to achieve efficient and effective dance movements. This chapter reviews class modification during rehabilitation using our progression for return to ballet class following lower extremity injury. Specific injuries may require slower progression, therefore no time frames are provided. A rationale is provided for each modification during rehabilitation. The viewer can use these concepts to further modify to protect specific diagnoses.

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